Analysis of a phone bill

Things seem to be working now and Hubby has managed to access our account , though there is no way I’m going back into our joint email account today!

As mentioned, our phone bill this month is way over budget, and although I have it covered, it still goes against the grain.
To give you an idea of how often we use our landline, we made 22 calls, 10 of which were to the bank who shortened their recordings about the Coronavirus outbreak in July thus our call costs have reduced, seven to the surgery and five others.
All charges are subject to 20% tax.

Line rental made up 41.21% of the bill, but as expected the majority of the call cost was to our doctor’s surgery, equating to 24.3% of the total amount.
One call to the surgery cost us £2.07, one at £1.70 and 3 at £1.32. The cheap ones were the times I rang and reception wasn’t open yet so I hung up.
The bank came in second place with 24.23% of the total and all other calls made up the remaining 10.26%.
I can hear you say why don’t we ditch the landline, but we have a very good broadband package fixed for two years which gives us both unlimited access to the internet and that’s why we have it.  Most calls are made via our PAYG mobiles which I top up for about £15 a month. This is also cheaper than those with contracts, internet access and a whole caboodle of apps and stuff we are unlikely to use or want. It suits us and that’s what matters.

Perhaps I should add here that our monthly landline budget is £30, so by deducting all calls to the surgery, we would have been quids in as we have been all year until now.

About pensitivity101

I am a retired number cruncher with a vivid imagination and wacky sense of humour which extends to short stories and poetry. I love to cook and am a bit of a dog whisperer as I get on better with them than people sometimes! We have an elderly dog called Maggie who adopted us as a 7 week old pup in March 2005. From 2014 to 2017 'Home' was a 41 foot narrow boat where we made strong friendships both on and off the water. We were close to nature enjoying swan and duck families for neighbours, and it was a fascinating chapter in our lives. We now reside in a small bungalow on the Lincolnshire coast where we have forged new friendships and interests.
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20 Responses to Analysis of a phone bill

  1. fransiweinstein says:

    It really is a shame you can’t communicate with your surgery by email.

  2. They do the same thing here with the bundle packages for cable. We have a portal with the Dr’s office and it works well for communicating

  3. murisopsis says:

    Budgets are hard to predict any more. I had budgeted for our phones (mobile) and they suddenly upped the taxes and fees. The same with our electric and gas utilities. All of a sudden we have a special fee that we are charged to help offset the cost of buying the electric from another company… Crazy!

    • It is nuts, which is why we aim for a fixed rate tariff for at least two years. The landline is one, and our utility for gas and electric another, though we had to sign up for smart meters to get that.

  4. Ian Kay says:

    When we moved in last year, we had fibre optic internet put in straightaway, all the way into the house, so we didn’t bother registering the BT landline. We used to get so many cold callers before. It’s still physically connected and there’s even a socket in the hall but it’s not live. We were advised by the fibre optic ISP to sign up to a free web phone service but we haven’t bothered with it either. Still, we pay £45 per month for the fibre optic broadband, all in, but it is ultrasuperfast!

    We switched to giffgaff recently for mobile services. I pay £6 per month for unlimited calls and texts, and 500MB of data. But I’m a light user, I rarely use more than 15% of that.

    • My mobile is Tesco and as I only use my phone for texts and calls (and occasionally taking a photo), topping up at £10 as and when is fine for me.
      I’m not techno savvy and find it all confusing, so finding something that works that I am comfortable with using is a plus plus. Our income is limited, so we have a tight budget to work with. £45 a month is only a pound less than what we’re paying for our gas and electricity combined.

  5. Michael says:

    I could never do what you do Di, it would drive me nuts, but I guess we all do things in our own way.

    • It was my job in the bank Michael, and figures had to be balanced a variety of ways, which is why I loved it so much. It sort of stuck when I retired so that I could keep my hand in just in case I had to go back into an office. I’m pleased to say I don’t do this with every bill we get, it was just an exercise as it was more than usual and how much onus we could put on the doctor’s surgery! Have a good weekend.

      • Michael says:

        Sorry Di, I wasn’t meaning to sound derogatory of what you do, we all have our ways of ‘accounting’ though I know my ‘method’ probably leaves a lot to be desired.But I do understand what you are saying about what you do. I’m probably subconsciously jealous…Stay safe.

      • Not taken that way at all Michael, last thing on my mind actually. The irony is I always enjoyed numbers even as a child, so to land a financial analytical job in my forties was an added bonus!

  6. Carol anne says:

    My phone bill comes in at over 100 euro every month, but that’s because I have my internet and mobile phone as well as my landline with the same company, my internet is unlimited, I need it as I download a lot of books and stream a lot of movies and TV shows.

    • We’ve always said that we will have the best we can afford to suit our needs. We only have the landline for the broadband package as we only use the phone for banking or secure calls. Hubby watches the old B&Ws on youtube sometimes, but I’m usually blogging away!

  7. Pingback: Today is Monday 7th September | pensitivity101

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