Saturday Mix – Mad About Metaphor, 18 January 2020

This week Sarah’s dipping her toes into the pool of METAPHOR. Our challenge is all about the use of metaphor in our writing. You will need to use the metaphor provided in your response – which can be poetry or prose.

Our metaphor this week is:

– You are my sunshine.

Are you someone’s sunshine?
Have you found your own personal sunshine in your partner or a beloved pet?
I’ve referred to sunshine in an earlier post today already.
The song says ‘You make me happy when skies are grey’, but I can recall instances when someone in particular has walked into a room and you felt everyone’s spirits lift.
I can also remember a foster boy’s smile dividing his face when he realised his Christmas gift of a ghetto blaster was his to keep, not on loan for the duration of his stay.

Sunny smiles and happy memories.
You are my sunshine, know how much I love you, and the sunshine will never fade.
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About pensitivity101

I am a retired number cruncher with a vivid imagination and wacky sense of humour which extends to short stories and poetry. I love to cook and am a bit of a dog whisperer as I get on better with them than people sometimes! We have an elderly dog called Maggie who adopted us as a 7 week old pup in March 2005. From 2014 to 2017 'Home' was a 41 foot narrow boat where we made strong friendships both on and off the water. We were close to nature enjoying swan and duck families for neighbours, and it was a fascinating chapter in our lives. We now reside in a small bungalow on the Lincolnshire coast where we have forged new friendships and interests.
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9 Responses to Saturday Mix – Mad About Metaphor, 18 January 2020

  1. msjadeli says:

    Aw that’s a sweet story about the foster child.

    • He was a 14 year old coloured boy and I’d be warned he had a serious aggression problem. I never saw it and he was one of the best kids I had in my care.

      • msjadeli says:

        Bless your heart, Di. It takes sensitivity and respect, and good listening skills to be successful in working with kids (and adults) with trauma in their history. Kids have a 6th sense about who is “real” and who isn’t. You gave him a shot at life beyond his trauma.

      • I was very lucky with the kids placed with me, except the last girl who turned out to be quite a nasty piece of work when she didn’t get her own way. I felt like a million bucks when one of my lads came back to say thank you. Made it all worthwhile.

      • msjadeli says:

        Di, I don’t think luck had a lot to do with it. It takes skill/compassion. If it makes you feel any better about that last girl, when I did juvenile probation, one of my standard statements when a girl got assigned to me was, “one girl should equal ten boys” because they are that much more labor-intensive. The biggest risk factor I found with the girls is when they started running away, as when they were on the streets all sorts of bad things could — and did — happen to them.

      • Thanks for this Li.
        This one played truant from school so I physically handed her over to a member of staff and collected her from one at the end of the school day. She didn’t do it again as it was in front of her friends.
        Later though she turned on us and accused Partner of abuse. All lies of course but I insisted on having her moved and spent the next eight months clearing his name.

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