Weekend Writing Prompt: #44

Sammi has given us Fallen as our word prompt and this photo for inspiration.

This week I’m just writing from the prompt and picture together, but you can check out Sammi’s challenges here:
https://wordpress.com/read/feeds/20204174/posts/1784072603

Hubby and I love walking in the woods, and have seen some pretty dramatic damage over the years. In the 90s we had severe storms which uprooted trees and Hubby was dwarfed in the crater left by one. Forest pathways were blocked with fallen debris so it was quite an obstacle course but we knew various routes and where to avoid adders or boggy marshes.
My GSD Kizzy wasn’t exactly bright, and stood with her feet on a fallen trunk whining to be lifted over. The fact that she could have moved less than a foot to one side and walked under it was purely incidental.

We sort of adopted an elm tree in the New Forest.
It was off the beaten track, about a mile in from the car park. We calculated it to be about 170 years old, with a girth of some 27 feet. Not bad seeing as we only had our arms to measure with and had to improvise.
The tree held significance for us for however bad the weather was, it survived whatever battering came its way. We associated it with the knocks we’d both taken in life, believing that as long as the tree stood, we could face whatever life had to offer, good or bad, together. Certain notches and nodules in the bark resembled a crone’s face, another looked like a baby, and one was a definite heart. To us, the tree had a personality, hidden depths, and was solid and reliable in a crisis (as in the storms).

It was so peaceful there, I fell asleep on a bed of leaves shielded by a large trunk of another tree whilst Kizzy kept watch and Hubby relaxed to the birdsong.
We once took Sis and her husband to see it, but they didn’t see what we did. Neither could they understand why we were so attached to it and we wished we hadn’t shared what was to us a special place.
One Sunday when we came across it, one of the main branches had snapped.
It reached down to the ground from quite a height, not completely severed, as if balancing itself ready to walk away. It never did, and stayed like that for years, even sprouting new foliage by the time we left Dorset in 2007.
I often wonder if it is still standing or if anyone found our two ‘message bottles’ we’d buried in the roots. After our initial writings all those years ago, we’re still going strong.

About pensitivity101

I am a retired number cruncher with a vivid imagination and wacky sense of humour which extends to short stories and poetry. I love to cook and am a bit of a dog whisperer as I get on better with them than people sometimes! In November 2020, we lost our beloved Maggie who adopted us as a 7 week old pup in March 2005. We decided to have a photo put on canvas as we had for her predecessor Barney. We now have three pictures of our fur babies on the wall as we found a snapshot of Kizzy, my GSD when Hubby and I first met so had hers done too. On February 24th 2022 we were blessed to find Maya, a 13 week old GSD pup who has made her own place in our hearts. You can follow our training methods, photos and her growth in my blog posts. From 2014 to 2017 'Home' was a 41 foot narrow boat where we made strong friendships both on and off the water. We were close to nature enjoying swan and duck families for neighbours, and it was a fascinating chapter in our lives. We now reside in a small bungalow on the Lincolnshire coast where we have forged new friendships and interests.
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4 Responses to Weekend Writing Prompt: #44

  1. tidalscribe says:

    I nhope your tree is still there; trees are very good at renewing themselves. Did you ever see The Green Man in the New Forest?

  2. A lovely response to the prompt. I too hope your special tree is still there 🙂

    • So do we, but we haven’t been back to the forest for well over 10 years now. Even when we visited down south, the forest was off our list because of some disease that was running rife which could be fatal to dogs in the areas we used to frequent.

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