Accidents Happen

Living aboard can have its ups and downs, especially in windy weather as recently experienced courtesy of Doris.
Obviously our pontoon is illuminated at night, but not to the dazzling effect of street lamps, but small lights atop electricity bollards and water hoses. It’s enough to see by in poor light but anyone with any sense carries a torch, especially if they have a black dog πŸ™‚

We heard a thump last night before going to bed, but no splashing or calls for help, though we did look out of the window to investigate and saw nothing. This morning it transpires that the boat two along had lost a plank (walk board to shore) and a small chair which had been on its roof. Hubby helped try and locate it with his magnet to no avail, but the plank was retrieved and is now tied securely in position.
magnetThe boat in between the two of us is smaller than ours, and the owners come down periodically to take it out for a few nights or just to have a weekend away from the rat race.
They are a pleasant enough couple, a little older than us, and what we would describe as academics. I’ve mentioned them before as for two small people they are exceedingly heavy footed, but at least Maggie has started to get used to them now and doesn’t alarm up as often unless they walk down the finger alongside and thus pass our window.

Today, we heard a heavy thud and some heated, though not blue, language so immediately got up to see what had happened and to offer assistance if needed.
The gentleman next door had fallen into his boat having missed his footing by apparently trying to ‘jump’ in and appears to have sprained his ankle rather badly.
He was not very pleased with himself (embarrassment I’d guess) and rather than accept anyone’s help, decided to apply RICE (rest, ice, compress and elevate).
hospitalHubby and one of our visiting boating friends were concerned , offering the use of a walking stick and a trip down to A&E as he was in a considerable amount of pain and discomfort, but the guy wouldn’t hear of it. From what I overheard, he was actually quite hostile towards them both, saying he knew what he was doing, that he knew best, and he didn’t like being told what he should do.
Exit two boaters stage left.

This evening we bumped into his wife who told us his ankle had started to swell and they were going to apply a crepe bandage. We offered a (new) compression bandage from our first aid kit, and she said she’d let us know.
We haven’t heard anything, so hope everything is OK.
first-aidAs an aside, our first aid kit has been put to good use for minor cuts incurred by fellow boaters working on their vessels when a chisel or knife slipped. We always keep it up to date and well equipped because being out on the river, sometimes it’s not exactly easy to get medical aid. You may remember me mistaking my thumb for a carrot in this post.

We may also have an opportunity to attend a first aid course later in the year.
I was a first aider when I worked for the bank, and was told I had a good resuss technique.
resussMy certificate expired way back in 2002 so a refresher course would certainly be a good move. Accidents do happen so it is always best to be prepared, and for us, accept any help offered.

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About pensitivity101

Retired number cruncher with a vivid imagination, loves to cook, favourite food everything especially chocolate and jelly babies. Best friends are Hubby and Dog, Bro and our Dominoes Friend aka MOH (and his dog). Also a bit of a dog whisperer as I get on better with them than people sometimes! Due to a nightmare of a house sale in 2014, 'Home' is now a 41 foot narrow boat. It's different and having swan and duck families for neighbours is much more relaxing on the eye not to mention the ears!
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3 Responses to Accidents Happen

  1. scifihammy says:

    Always a good idea to have a refresher course in first aid. you never know when you might need it. πŸ™‚

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