Counting the days

These are the pictures I took of the swan on the nest this morning.
It’s a magnificent structure. I don’t know if it was the male or female ‘sitting’ (apparently the female has a paler beak) but the other was to my left some distance away, watching my every move.

swan on nest 2 swan on nest 1 swan on nest

Source RSPB.
The male and the female birds, the cob and pen, usually attempt to mate for life, although it is not true to say that if one of the birds were to die the other would necessarily pine away. It is possible for an adult bird to find an alternative mate.
The nest is a huge mound of material, normally dried grasses and assorted vegetation, sticks and rushes, constructed at the water’s edge. The nest is built by the female, while the male supplies the materials.
The female lays up to seven eggs between late April and early May. Both sexes incubate the eggs, which hatch after 35-41 days.
Young birds will not generally breed for the first two years of adult life.

I’ve seen a flock of swans in the field running parallel to the dog walk, and a lone swan comes alongside our boat quite often.
swan portsideOn the river last week, I took several photos of them, either in groups or singly.
I think they are majestic and graceful.

Digital Camera                                 swan river

Digital CameraAll photos in this post are mine.

About pensitivity101

I am a retired number cruncher with a vivid imagination and wacky sense of humour which extends to short stories and poetry. I love to cook and am a bit of a dog whisperer as I get on better with them than people sometimes! We have recently lost our beloved dog Maggie who adopted us as a 7 week old pup in March 2005. We decided to have a photo put on canvas as we had for her predecessor Barney, and now have three pictures of our fur babies on the wall as we found a snapshot of my GSD so had hers done too. From 2014 to 2017 'Home' was a 41 foot narrow boat where we made strong friendships both on and off the water. We were close to nature enjoying swan and duck families for neighbours, and it was a fascinating chapter in our lives. We now reside in a small bungalow on the Lincolnshire coast where we have forged new friendships and interests.
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6 Responses to Counting the days

  1. scifihammy says:

    So many swans! Beautiful 🙂 And excellent photos 🙂 I look forward to seeing the chicks 🙂

  2. They truly are one of the most stunning creatures on this earth, and to think you have the privilege to see this young family begin new lives is so exciting. Your photos are wonderful.
    I can’t believe the nest isn’t disturbed–it seems so open and available to prey. But perhaps I can remember back to the one encounter I had with a swan on a French river bank. I ran for my life at one point. That bird was seriously intent on having my picnic.
    And many thanks for the heartwarming words on my post today. You have such a lovely way of offering kindness and encouragement.
    Cheers

    • You’re welcome.
      The swans have built their nest between a pontoon and the river bank, so it’s protected to some extent. I’ve never been able to get so close to one before, as the one in Lincolnshire was on the other side of the river bank to where we used to walk, so I had no idea how big the nest can actually be.
      The swan that comes up to the boat was staring at me when I opened the cover the other morning to take Maggie out. It hissed, but didn’t back off or show any other sign of aggression, and Maggie didn’t make any effort at all to get close to it. Hopefully they’ve ‘reached an understanding’. I should have more Swan posts over the next couple of months and I’m really looking forward to seeing any babies!

  3. Beautiful! I can’t wait to see the ugly ducklings!

  4. Pingback: Royalty aren’t the only ones to have a new arrival! | pensitivity101

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